Category Archives: Associated Press

Superior Courts San Mateo County are Open Why? L.A. County are Closed.

As of yesterday afternoon I was unable to tell Liz Valencia the Mother of Vincent Valencia who is scheduled to be sentenced to Prison this morning in Judge Susan Greenberg’s court if the Superior Courts were open or not. I checked the websites and I sent this e-mail to SMC District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe for this information. Liz lives in Fresno a 3 hour drive plus there is a Stay in Place Order in effect. D.A. Wagstaffe did not reply which is unusual for him.

Here is a Letter I sent by Certified Mail to Judge Greenberg regarding Vincent Valencia.

Michael G. Stogner                                                                     Date: March 11, 2020 831-210-8994 michaelgstogner@yahoo.com

Honorable Judge Susan Greenberg

Southern Court 400 County Center

Redwood City, California 94063

Regarding: March 17, 2020 Sentencing

Vincent Valencia 19-SF-003527-A & 19-SF-008911-A

Dear Honorable Judge Susan Greenberg,

I am writing you as a Private Victim’s Advocate who has No relationship or Conflict of Interest with speaking out about Vincent Valencia. I’m very concerned that San Mateo County and the Courts have failed to acknowledge his long history of Mental Health Issues. His Mother Liz Valencia drove up from Fresno to inform the Board of Supervisors recently about his Mental History which goes back to his childhood. She stated he has been arrested more than 100 times in the last 10 years. That all by itself should be the Red Flag that something is very wrong and possibly Not Criminal. You will see from prior court records he pleads often when he is represented by the Private Defender Program. No Jury Trial.

I hope that bringing this to your attention will cause you to ask the appropriate questions, He clearly doesn’t understand this process even though the Court records state Defendant was advised of and understood Charges and Direct Consequences of plea. Jan. 27. 2020

Thank You for being the Safety Net.

Sincerely,

Michael G. Stogner

Michael Stogner <michaelgstogner@yahoo.com>To:Steve Wagstaffe Mon, Mar 16 at 5:30 PMHello Steve,
Are the courts still open this week?
Thank You 
Michael

Courts in L.A. will be closed till Friday

By James Queally and Matt Hamilton

All Los Angeles County court proceedings will be suspended for several days as concerns about the spread of the coronavirus continue to mount, court officials announced Monday.

The nation’s largest court system will go dark from March 17 to 19, according to a statement issued by Presiding Judge Kevin Brazile. Court will reopen Friday for “the limited purpose of hearing or handling essential or emergency matters.”

“The Superior Court of Los Angeles County is committed to providing equal access to justice through the fair, timely and efficient resolution of all cases. However, it is imperative that we continue aligning our Court with the most recent directives and guidelines issued by our national, state and local public health officials,” the statement read. “Let me be clear: we will continue to serve the needs of the most vulnerable people in Los Angeles County—our children, the elderly, domestic violence victims, people whose life and liberty interests are at stake, and in many other emergent cases as is possible and safe.”

Brazile had previously asked that new criminal and civil trials be put on hold for at least 30 days. The three-day suspension is being carried out with the approval of California’s chief justice, Tani Cantil-Sakauye.

Courts in Orange County also announced late Monday that they were suspending all proceedings until March 27 due to the public health crisis.

Los Angeles County courts are expected to reopen Friday, but a lengthier stalling of judicial proceedings is possible.

Three law enforcement officials told The Times that Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey sent a message to prosecutors over the weekend telling them that a 30-day delay of all active jury trials was likely to be implemented. The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity in order to discuss the matter candidly.

The district attorney’s office did not respond to requests for comment.

In his statement Monday, Brazile said he would release additional information in the coming days about further reductions in judicial and court services.

The announcement comes as criminal justice officials in California continue to struggle with how spread of the virus will impact courthouses and jails.

Over the weekend, Los Angeles County court officials announced the suspension of the high-profile murder trial of New York real estate scion Robert Durst.

Judges were also encouraged to shift toward telephonic proceedings to lower traffic in the region’s courthouses.

Statewide, courthouses have taken a patchwork of measures to deal with the threat the virus poses to jurors and staff, ranging from trial delays to temporary building closures to excusing older jurors.

Lou Shapiro, a criminal defense attorney in Century City, applauded Brazile’s decision and said it was a relief for the attorneys and court staff that he knew.

“Many attorneys are really scared to go to work right now. You don’t have effective advocates if they are always living in fear,” Shapiro said.

He said that in the long term, the benefits of temporary closure would be more apparent.

“Because this disease is so contagious, if it does go around the court staff and lawyers, what justice will be served? What kind of advocates can public defenders and criminal defense attorneys be if they are quarantined?” Shapiro asked. “It’s better to sit out a few days or weeks. At the end of it, the defendants’ rights will be better served by taking this short-term break, rather than letting it ride and seeing how it goes.”

Michele Hanisee, president of the union representing deputy district attorneys, said the interruptions could prove significant for active trials, and suggested judges may allow for a review of prior testimony to allow jurors to re-acclimate themselves with evidence in case of prolonged delays.

“This is new, uncharted territory for everyone presently alive. It’s hard to know what’s too little and what’s too much. Everyone is proceeding with caution,” she said.

Nikhil Ramnaney, president of the union representing Los Angeles County public defenders, said he believed the court should have taken action sooner given the ease with which the virus could spread in a courthouse.

“I think now they’re finally taking this seriously … in terms of my membership, in the last 72 hours it’s been insane how many people are very, very scared,” he said. “It’s impossible given the facilities to engage in social distancing.”

Ramnaney also noted that while the shutdown is necessary to prevent spread among lawyers, law enforcement officers and others who move in and out of the county’s sprawling court system, it could also worsen problems for at-risk individuals who are incarcerated.

“During the next three days, what venue do we have to petition for the release of very vulnerable people?” he asked. “That to me is the really difficult one.… How do we strike a balance between our own personal safety, and the safety of our families, and the safety of incarcerated people?”

Before the announcement was made, the county’s top public defender, Ricardo Garcia, told The Times in an interview that any adjustments the court makes must stand up to constitutional muster.

“If there’s any situation where client rights are infringed on, we will object,” Garcia said, noting that keeping defendants out of custody was among his top priorities.

Garcia said that public defenders were confronting difficult dilemmas amid the closures of courthouses, trial delays and a widening public health crisis.

“Right now people are torn: They have two competing interests as attorneys. The first being the desire to protect themselves and their family, the people they love,” Garcia said, “and the second is the people they’ve dedicated their careers to protect: their clients.”

Posted on Superior Courts Website Today March 17, 2020

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The public expects criminal charges filed are Accurate and Honest, Juan P. Lopez case proves that is not true in San Mateo County.

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Update November 6, 2019 Juan P. Lopez Declined the D.A.’s Offer & said “Lets go to Trial.” Next Court Date:November 12, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM 400 County Center Redwood City these Motions will be heard.

Motion to dismiss for Break of Chain of Custody

Motion to dismiss for Discovery Violations

Motion of Brady Violations

Motion of Outrageous Govt. Conduct

This Letter to the Editor was not published, That’s 84,000 San Mateo County Residents who won’t see this information. Jon Mays has decided this is not Newsworthy.

Michael Stogner <michaelgstogner@yahoo.com>

To: Editor San Mateo Daily Journal Nov 2 at 6:58 AM

The public expects criminal charges filed are accurate and honest, Juan P. Lopez case proves that is not true in San Mateo County

Editor

November 6, 2019 SSF Court 1:30 PM

X Deputy Juan P. Lopez will inform the court of his response to the District Attorneys Office Offer of No Prison Time if he accepts the deal.

Everyone in San Mateo County remembers Five years ago he was arrested at gun point in front of his son for Smuggling a Cellphone and Drugs to a Hells Angel Inmate at the Redwood City Jail. Big press conference by D. A. Wagstaffe at the time, It was also reported he embezzled up to $400,000 of campaign donations. One small problem with that was he only raised about $400.00. Those charges were all dismissed because of Prosecutorial Misconduct. He is now being offered a deal to plead guilty to charges that came from the BACKPACK that was stolen from his car which was parked at his condo in Redwood City. That theft happened shortly after he filed papers as a Write In Candidate for Sheriff. A search warrant was then created looking for what they already had “Documents that were stolen” Mortgage Fraud the owner occupied box had a check mark in it. The lender never filed a complaint.

Any concerned citizens/residents are invited to join us in court November 6, 2019

Michael G. Stogner

Monterey County

I first met Sheriff Deputy Juan P. Lopez right after he announced he was going to be a candidate for Sheriff in San Mateo County in 2014. I thanked him for giving the residents a choice for Sheriff. I was on the phone with him when he got arrested at gun point at one of his homes. I was with him when the Sheriff’s Office served him with legal papers at his home, I opened the door and greeted the 2 Sheriff Deputies. I was with him and another concerned citizen Lamont Phemister when the Sheriff’s Office ordered him to be at the Gun Range to receive more legal papers. The first time they gave him 90 minutes notice, the second time 4 day notice.

Sheriff Deputy Juan P. Lopez was charged with 14 Felony Counts 5 years ago. The District Attorney’s Office, The Sheriff’s Office and County Counsel’s Office have done everything possible to cause harm to him and those close to him. He has lost 5 years of Income, his last year he earned about $250,000. He has hired 2 Law Firms you can guess that cost is over $200,000.

Now Five Years later the District Attorneys Office Offers a Plea Bargain the day It’s lead Investigator Jordan Boyd was to take the Witness stand. Tomorrow he and his attorneys will inform the Court and all of San Mateo County his response.

I personally think that is Newsworthy I might be wrong.

By Michael G. Stogner

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SMC Sheriff Sgt. Irfan Zaidi Qualifies as a Brady Officer. Is He on the List? Who controls the list? Is there even a List?

The law enforcement profession requires integrity and trust and an officer who lies violates that trust and tarnishes the integrity of the profession.

October 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM Millbrae, California, Chinedu Okoki a 36 year old man was walking down the sidewalk on El Camino Real. Within 10 minutes he was Tasered 7 times, sprayed in the face with O.C. spray as six San Mateo County Sheriff Employees were on top of him. He was completely limp, unconscious, and never made a sound again. He died there on the spot in the Custody of the Sheriff’s Office.

San Mateo County Sheriff Sergeant Zaidi was not one of the Six Sheriff Employees involved in the In-Custody Death of Chinedu Okobi. Nineteen days later, On October 22, 2018 he filed an Official Report with the District Attorney’s Office making knowingly false statements.

” I directed Deputy Lorenzatti to remove the metal handcuffs from the suspect which she did, and the suspect was placed on his back. The Fire Department and AMR promptly began CPR.”

District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe on March 1, 2019 provided a video that he and his Team produced for the public it can be found on his website. The placing Chinedu Okobi on his back and CPR starts at the 18:50 mark. The video shows Deputy Lorenzatti did Not remove the handcuffs.

SMCSO Deputy Lorenzatti made an official statement on 10/04/2018 3:50 PM. to Inspector Eric Suzuki.

“They were like, well let’s get him on his back and start CPR, So then I, you know helped em, bring him to his back.

Question? “Okay and were his Handcuffs off at that point?”

Answer: No they were still on.

Eng. #37 Mazza Statement: “When decedent was lifted onto the gurney, a police officer cadet or trainee removed the Handcuffs from the decedents wrists.”

AMR #94 Retanubun Statement: “They put the decedent on to a “Mega Mover” when noticed the decedent still had handcuffs on.” “Saw police cadet nearby who assisted them with the removal of the Handcuffs.”

AMR #37 Uhland: “So they laid the decedent on his back with the Handcuffs still on his wrists.”

AMR #94 Pham: “Decedent was on his back with Handcuffs on when he arrived.”

AMR #37 Holman: “When they rolled the decedent over to remove the Handcuffs, she noticed several scrapes on his hands and a few small abrasion on his back.” “She was unsure if the injuries were there prior or if caused by the CPR application.”

According to Wagstaffe’ Video, Chinedu Okobi was placed on his back at 18:26 mark.

CPR starts at 18:50 mark with Handcuffs On and Hands behind his back.

Handcuffs Removed at 28:47 mark after almost 10 minutes of Chest Compressions.

What caused Sheriff Sgt. Zaidi to file this Bizarre False Official Statement?

District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe’s Video and Data made public March 1, 2019

LATIMES Article June 6, 2019

Note: 300 Deputies on the list. Sheriff Alex Villanueva, has called the Brady list a “fake list” and says it was the result of corrupt investigations designed to retaliate against certain deputies.

Should deputies’ misconduct be disclosed to D.A.?

Justices seem split on ruling that bars sheriff from giving officers’ names to prosecutors.
By Maura Dolan and Maya Lau
The California Supreme Court appeared divided Wednesday over a ruling that barred the Los Angeles County sheriff from giving prosecutors the names of deputies who have committed misconduct.
During a hearing, the state high court weighed an appeal of a decision that prohibited the sheriff from giving the district attorney the names of deputies with a history of bad behavior, including lying, taking bribes, tampering with evidence, using unreasonable force or engaging in domestic violence.
By law, prosecutors are required to disclose to defendants exculpatory evidence, including information that could diminish the credibility of police officers who worked on a case.
Several justices suggested Wednesday that prosecutors need the information to fulfill their constitutional duty to disclose potentially exonerating information.
That position has been endorsed by defense lawyers, prosecutors and the California attorney general.
Justice Goodwin Liu noted that prosecutors ultimately bear liability for failing to disclose favorable evidence.
If the prosecution is unaware that such evidence exists, convictions — even valid convictions — may eventually be overturned because of a failure to disclose, he said.
“The prosecution can’t take an ostrich-like approach to this very important duty,” Liu said.
But Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye suggested that the Legislature, not the court, might want to take steps to ensure that exonerating information is disclosed to the defense.
She said one possible remedy was to give trial judges sealed lists of law enforcement officers who have a history of misconduct. The judges could review those lists privately in chambers to determine whether the officers’ records were relevant in the case and should be disclosed.
“Doesn’t delivering the list directly to the court under seal … meet the problem without intruding overtly on the officers’ privacy?” she asked.
Justice Ming W. Chin also repeatedly asked whether that path, if carved out by the Legislature or by the court in a future case, could resolve the problem.
The case before the court stems from a lawsuit filed by the L.A. deputies union to prevent former Sheriff Jim McDonnell from turning over to the district attorney about 300 names of deputies with a history of misconduct.
A divided, Los Angeles-based court of appeal ruled in 2017 that the list must be kept secret, even in pending criminal cases in which errant deputies were expected to testify.
The state high court’s decision, due in 90 days, would affect law enforcement agencies throughout the state.
The case pits the privacy rights of law enforcement officers against the constitutional duty of prosecutors to give the defense evidence that might cast doubt on a defendant’s guilt, reduce a potential sentence or diminish the credibility of prosecution witnesses.
That duty stems from a landmark 1963 U.S. Supreme Court case, Brady vs. Maryland, which said suppression of evidence favorable to the defense violated due process.
At issue is only whether the names can be turned over to prosecutors, not whether they would become public.
But the presence of the names on a list means deputies could be one step closer to having their disciplinary files scrutinized by a judge and their police work called into question during a court proceeding.
Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuellar noted that the constitutional duty to disclose evidence favorable to the defense trumps state law intended to protect the privacy of law enforcement officers. He suggested the court could “harmonize” the laws.
He called the case “very challenging,” but also noted that “the Brady responsibility is on the state.”
Justice Joshua P. Groban expressed skepticism about the union’s legal arguments.
“You are saying as long as we can bar the door and keep the law enforcement agency from sharing that with the prosecution, then there is no Brady violation?” he asked the lawyer for the union.
Justice Carol A. Corrigan noted that officers whose names were on a list would have less privacy protection than others.
But she also said that a state law intended to protect officer privacy while allowing some disclosures may be hindering the release of information a criminal defendant is entitled to under the Constitution.
Under the system in place for four decades, defense attorneys and prosecutors may ask a trial judge to review an officer’s personnel file to determine whether there is evidence that must be disclosed.
But without knowing an officer’s history, a defense lawyer may not be able to persuade the judge to undertake a review.
“There are cases in which legitimate and material evidence is eluding their review,” Corrigan said.
Justice Leondra R. Kruger asked whether there were legal safeguards that could be imposed to protect officer privacy after the names were disclosed to prosecutors.
Aimee Feinberg, representing the state attorney general, said courts could issue protective orders to ensure the officers’ names were shielded from the public.
Geoffrey S. Sheldon, who argued for Los Angeles County, said he felt “good” about how the hearing went.
“I’m cautiously optimistic that we will prevail in the case,” he said.
Judith Posner, representing the union, said she couldn’t predict the outcome.
“There were a lot of interesting and probing questions on both sides,” she said.
Police departments in at least a dozen counties, including San Francisco, Sacramento and Ventura, have had a regular practice of sending prosecutors the names of so-called Brady list officers.
California’s strict laws protecting officer personnel files — which underpinned the appellate court’s ruling for the deputies union — were dramatically altered by a new transparency law that opened up records of confirmed cases of lying and sexual misconduct by officers, as well as shootings and serious uses of force.
SB 1421, which went into effect Jan. 1, allows the public to see many of the documents at issue in the L.A. County sheriff’s case.
But the new law does not apply to the broader range of misconduct that could put an officer on a Brady list, including domestic abuse, sexual harassment, racial discrimination and bribery.
Sheriff Alex Villanueva, who ousted McDonnell in a stunning upset last fall, has called the Brady list a “fake list” and says it was the result of corrupt investigations designed to retaliate against certain deputies.

By Michael G. Stogner

 

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Stogner Report on Chinedu Okobi In-Custody Death.

This is a work in progress.

There were Six San Mateo County Sheriff Employees not Five. It’s illegal for a civilian to participate in the takedown of Chinedu Okobi. Everybody in Law Enforcement knows that. CSO Joseph Gonzales is a civilian.

Nicole Basurto, A very good and concerned Citizen, Witness not found by Sheriff Office. She called in.“Thought it was odd the Deputies did not try to arrest Decedent Okobi when he was on the ground.”She was fairly certain that he died at the scene.” “A male deputy hit Okobi 3-4 times with a closed fist, seemed directed to his head.”

San Mateo County Deputy Coroner Heather Diaz #21 “I have determined the manner of Death to be Homicide.”

San Mateo County Sheriff IT Technician Johnson Hang was unable to download Deputy Wang & Sergeant Weidner’s MAV  Video from patrol cars at the crime scene. Why?

Menlo Park Police Officer Joshua Russell unable to download his witness interviews he tried twice, Vie-Vu software owned by Axon.

San Mateo County Criminalist II Anthony Delmonico: District Attorney’s office requesting the Forensic Investigation of an “In-Custody Death.”

Caption in D.A.’s video at the 7:22 mark “ A deputy attempts to subdue Okobi with Pepper Spray, but mistakenly hits his fellow deputies and Sergeant.” Steve Wagstaffe does not identify the sprayer as Deputy Wang, Why? His Expert Jeffrey Martin says it was Deputy Wang. There is only one Deputy it could be and that is Wang. There is one other possibility and that might be why Wagstaffe chose not to identify Wang as the sprayer of Pepper Spray. “At the t 7:18 mark Civilian CSO Joseph Gonzales’s right hand can clearly be seen unholstering and discharging pepper spray.” He then puts it back in his belt and backs away.

Sergeant Weidner calls it a Crime Scene at 11:31 mark. Why is arresting a suspect a Crime Scene?

Sergeant Weidner 13:26 Mark on cellphone “Dude’s alive that’s all you need to know, We’re good.”

Sergeant Weidner 10/03/2018  says Okobi was Pepper Sprayed changes story. Why?

14:35 mark says: “He’s been tasered several times and Peppered Sprayed.”

15:03 mark says: “ He’s been tased twice and Pepper Sprayed.”

Weidner Statement to Jamie Draper on 10/04/2018 prepared 10/12/2018

“He was told later it was Deputy Wang who deployed the pepper spray at that point in the struggle; however he did not see him do it.” Sergeant Weidner speculated the pepper spray was possibly directed upward at the subject’s face while he was in a somewhat prone position on the ground which caused the spray to miss the subject completely and instead strike Deputy Watt, Deputy Lorenzatti and Sergeant Weidner.

D.J. Wozniak President of the Deputy Sheriff Association, the Union calls Sgt. Weiner at the Crime Scene audio goes silent. 22:10 mark. Why is he calling Weidner?

Deputy De Martini to Jamie Draper (Sincere report)

“He said he felt a Pulse but said due to the fact he had just been struggling with Okobi he was no longer certain if he felt Okobi’s pulse or his own.”

Also said “ I kind of raised up his head a little bit.”

Deputy Watt to Jamie Draper (Sincere report.)

“Said he was speaking to Decedent Okobi, telling him to relax and breath, But he did not recall Okobi ever saying anything in response.

San Mateo County District Attorney Office Video and Reports

San Mateo County District Attorney Office Press Conference March 1, 2019

 

 

 

 

March 1, 2019 San Mateo County District Attorney held a Press Conference.

The members of the Public were not included.

8:20 mark Steve Wagstaffe tells the reporters that the “Cause of Death was Cardiac Arrest.”

47:40 mark, KQED Reporter Julie Small asked “Do you know the manner of death?” Wagstaffe says “The Coroner of this County Labeled it a Homicide.” He went on to say Homicide occurring during interaction with that individual.”

Had Reporter Small of KQED not asked that question Steve Wagstaffe was not going to mention Homicide

I, Michael G. Stogner Co-owner of San Mateo County News.Com asked Steve Wagstaffe @ 37:39 mark.

“After Mr. Okobi stopped breathing, You mentioned in your presentation somebody said get him in a seated position, can you identify which deputy said that? 

Wagstaffe said, “It was Sgt Weidner, “He actually uses the words Positional Aphysixation watch for that, But he was breathing and he had a pulse.”

Q. By putting him in a seated position, Did his head not go forward and stop his breathing?” Note: Seated Position @ 10:27 mark

Wagstaffe said “It did not.””The belief was Not, that it did not occur.” “Because they continued to check for the breathing.” check head position at 10:27 mark it did go forward Mr. Wagstaffe.

Wagstaffe said, “But he was breathing and he had a pulse at the time.” “He actual uttered some words.” No Caption at time with words allegedly uttered 

Wagstaffe said, “It was a couple of minutes, several minutes after he was turned over to the AMR people.” “Deputies are out of the picture then it’s over to the medical people.”

The video does not support Steve Wagstaffe’s statement.

Video shows AMR #37 Suzanne Holman @17:55 mark giving Sternum Rub, Checking for a Pulse, and tilting head back. If a Reasonable Person takes the meaning of several minutes to mean 3 minutes that would take you to the 20:55 mark.

Wagstaffe said, He was still breathing when the Sheriff Deputies turned him over to the ARM people.” Question, What time was Okobi turned over to the AMR people? Question, Who from the FOUR AMR people is District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe talking about? Here are the AMR people, Suzanne Holman #37, Forrest Uhland #37, Patrick Pham #94 & Ferdinand Retanubun #94

According to Daly City Police Officer Joshua McQuade who interviewed S. Holman on 10/04/2018

AMR #37 Suzanne Holman “She said she did not touch the decedent.”

AMR #37: Forrest Uhland  “Did not render any medical aid to decedent Okobi personally.”

AMR #94 Ferdinand Retanubun said “His unit was assigned to treat the injured deputy who was bleeding from the face (Deputy Wang)

AMR #94 Partick Pham said he was assigned to attend to two (2) Sheriff’s Deputies whom he described as an Asian deputy with abrasions to his face, (Deputy Joshua Wang) and a bald deputy who had been exposed to pepper spray (Deputy Bryan Watt).

Wagstaffe said, “You can hear the AMR people say to him, Check the pulse make sure he is still breathing.” That sentence makes no sense at all. A Reasonable Person would have to ask, Who is Wagstaffe calling Him? He can’t be talking about Chinedu Okobi, He has been dead since 9:10 mark.

Wagstaffe said, “You don’t see them taking out their nightsticks.” -5:27 mark

Deputy Wang & Deputy Watt both brought out their Batons. In the DA’s Video at the 10:57 Mark you will see Deputy DeMartini Tampering with Evidence by picking up a Taser and Extended Baton and putting them in CSO’s Sheriff Pick Up Truck.

 

By Michael G. Stogner

 

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“Unconscionable””It shocks the conscience” Is it, and does it Really?

I think most people in the world would have found the “Sealed Order” Unconscionable. It could be seen as a San Mateo County Judge, protecting a “Those Who Matter” individual or a large Employer in the County, which it did. That 4 year old case is still current next court date is April 25, 2019.

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San Mateo County Superior Court Hon. Judge Raymond Swope.

November 30, 2018 2:PM Courtroom 8A, San Mateo County, California. The Hon. Judge Raymond Swope said:

“What has happened is unconscionable,”  “It shocks the conscience.” “And your conduct is not well taken by this court.”

Judge Swope ordered Mr.Kramer to hand over his laptop, cellphone and passwords to a forensic investigator and ordered Thomas Scaramellino, a member of the Six4Three legal team who was also an investor in the company, to provide his devices for document preservation.

Who is the Forensic Investigator for San Mateo County? The world should pray that it is not an employee of San Mateo County Counsel John Beiers, Sheriff Carlos Bolanos, District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe or a member of R.E.A.C.T. Taskforce.

I give the current 4 year criminal cases of Sheriff Deputy Juan P. Lopez and the recent sealed search warrant and sealed complaint for Jody L. Williams as just two examples of why you would not want any of the above to handle the Laptop, Cellphones etc.

The New York Times, Washington Post and Associated Press contended that the documents could help answer questions of great public interest about how Facebook handled user data.

Civil Case 533328

Bloomberg News October 10, 2018 Media requested Unsealed

Wired.com “FB sought to Destroy Evidence”

The Telegraph Article Dec, 1, 2018

Note to San Mateo County residents reading this, I was unable to attend yesterday’s hearing, I had 2 reporters in the courtroom, More importantly I notified 23 media and reporters first thing in the morning, letting them know this is a Big News story.

By Michael G. Stogner

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Filed under #SanMateo, #SanMateoCountyNews, #SMCJUSTICE, Associated Press, Carole Cadwalladr, Damian Collins, Jody L. Williams, Juan P. Lopez, Judges, Judicial Misconduct, Mark Zuckerberg, Michael G. Stogner, Organized Crime, Prosecutorial Misconduct, R.E.A.C.T. Task Force, RICO, San Mateo County Superior Court, Silicon Valley, SMC, Steve Wagstaffe, Ted Kramer, The New York Times, Thomas Scaramellino, Those Who Matter, Victim's Advocate, Washington Post