Category Archives: San Mateo County Manager

SMC Government wants your personal information. Senate Bill 821

What happens when the information is used for other purposes? Jody Williams is a good example. What is the real purpose of this bill?

 

What is the benefit of the additional 690,000 residents personal contact information in Carlos G. Bolanos, Steve Wagstaffe, Mike Callagy, Don Horsley, Warren Slocum, Dave Pine, Carole Groom, David Canepa hands? Lets say the motive is sincere, and now 800,000 residents all receive a message at the same time, Where do you think they are going in Gridlock San Mateo County? They are going to a parking lot, that is the reality.

This bill would authorize each county, including a city and county, to enter into an agreement to access the contact information of resident accountholders through the records of a public utility or other agency responsible for water service, waste and recycling services, or other property-related services for the sole purpose of enrolling county residents in a county-operated public emergency warning system. The bill would require any county that enters into such an agreement to include procedures to enable any resident to opt out of the warning system and a process to terminate the receiving agency’s access to the resident’s contact information. The bill would prohibit the use of the information gathered for any purpose other than for emergency notification.

Senate Bill No. 821

SMDJ Misleading Article

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San Mateo County Manager John Maltbie has retired.

John-Maltbie-1-1

John Maltie

San Mateo County Manager is Mike Callagy.

By Michael G. Stogner

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Time for an Audit. Mark Church always claims all is well at San Mateo County Elections Office.

Mark Churck

Mark Church SMC Elections Officer

I have received word that the SMC Elections office published election results a couple of days ago, which if true is a very bad thing.

Lets see what Mark Church says about this taken from his website several days ago.

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County voter receives two election ballots

Apparent irregularity sparks concern, but top election official claims all is well

  • Updated
William Holsinger

Will Holslinger Former San Mateo County Harbor District Commissioner, and attorney received 2 ballots this election.

William Holsinger

William Holsinger received his official ballot in the mail and sent it back to cast his vote, per his usual process as a permanent absentee voter for about the last 10 years.

Then another official ballot arrived in the mail the next day. Caught off guard by the irregularity, Holsinger, who is registered in San Mateo, called county election officials who told him that he could discard the duplicate.

Seeking some peace of mind, Holsinger said his primary interest was receiving a guarantee that being issued a second ballot would not invalidate his initial one.

“I wasn’t planning on voting twice,” he said. “I just wanted to make sure that my first one counted.”

Officials in a phone conversation were initially unable to offer that certainty though, said Holsinger. For his part, Jim Irizarry, the county’s assistant chief elections officer, suggested the second ballot is likely due to the complex nature of operating a countywide election.

“Voters receiving two ballots is a common occurrence due to the complex and fluid nature of voter registration,” he said in an email, suggesting a second ballot can be issued when a voter changes their status with the county. Altering party affiliations, addresses or other details in the county’s record are examples of the type of action which would prompt issuance of a second ballot.

Holsinger though said he had not changed his status with the county recently, making his second ballot all the more perplexing.

“I was a little puzzled,” he said.

To get clarification on whether the ballot was counted, Irizarry said the county offers a service which requires voters to share information such as their name, address and birthday.

“With this information, we can determine the number of ballots issued, when they were issued, what types of ballots were issued, if any ballots were voted or returned,” he said.

He added changes to the county record may not be immediately apparent to voters, as activity at the DMV for example may result in prompting a second ballot.

“Voters may not associate a second ballot with a DMV interaction made weeks ago, plus the time for the ballot to reach them,” Irizarry said.

He took time to note though that issuance of a second ballot would not invalidate the first. He said the voting system is designed to flag ballots in the case of potential redundancies, which then requires staffers to check the voter’s record, rather than automatically render it uncountable.

But so long as Holsinger only sent his first ballot, Irizarry confirmed his vote counted.

“If the voter … sent in his first ballot, and only that ballot, it would be counted despite the issuance of a second ballot,” he said.

Irizarry also tamped down concerns raised by those who were alarmed to see mock election results posted on the county elections office website in late October. Some felt the outcomes shown were real and may affect the behavior of those yet to vote.

Irizarry though said the mock results were not actual outcomes, and instead only a standard system testing mechanism commonly used by officials in advance of an election.

“These results are labeled ‘test’ or ‘mock’ to distinguish them from the actual reports released on Election night. Every system tested worked correctly. Once the mock election testing is complete, the numbers on racetracker revert to zero in preparation for Election night reporting,” he said.

The issues raised follow a series of missteps county officials have endured during election season.

First, officials found the county Board of Education race was left off sample ballots, causing elections officials to postpone sending actual ballots one week from Oct. 9 to Oct. 15 while they addressed the error.

Elections officials incorrectly identified the race as a district election, resulting in only those living in District 1 along the coast receiving information about the candidates in their sample ballot. The Board of Education candidates are required to be residents of the district they represent, but members are elected by voters across the county.

Irizarry said the additional information originally intended for the sample material was included with the actual ballot in an addendum which required additional time to craft. Elections officials sent out ballots last month, and voters still received their material within the legal time requirements.

Later, officials found the sample material problems carried over to real ballots, and dozens of overseas voters were sent ballots also omitting the Board of Education race. Officials were forced to scramble and assure those voters were offered ballots including the race.

For Holsinger, he shared fears that his experience could be a byproduct of a potentially dysfunctional system.

“I believe that good process makes for appropriate results. Bad process never has good results. And the ends don’t justify the means,” he said.

austin@smdailyjournal.com

(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

This is a perfect example of why I support elected official Sabrina Brennan she cares. If you know of any other San Mateo County elected official who has publicly commented on this subject let me know.

 

San Mateo County election irregularities:

1.) Why were multiple ballots mailed to individual voters…?2.) On Tuesday, Oct 30, 2018, Race Tracker was published on the San Mateo County Elections website with “mock” results. Voters discovered the Race Tracker results online when they Google searched a candidates name. The word ”mock“ was in fine print giving voters the impression the results were from votes cast in the Nov 2018 election. The “mock” results did not appear to berandomized.
3.) The *countywide* Board of Education election was excluded from the Sample Ballot pamphlet everywhere except the Coastside. Delaying the arrival of ballots by a week or more.
4.) The sample ballot problem carried over to real ballots, and dozens of overseas voters were sent ballots also omitting the Board of Education race.

Third-party audit needed of Elections Office

November 8, 2018

Editor,

I just completed my official San Mateo County vote-by-mail ballot. In addition to a mistake involving a position on the County Board of Education (the correction of which I’ve been told necessitated delaying distribution of the ballots), the provided instructions are incorrect. Specifically, step 3 calls for the voter to “remove the strip to seal the envelope” … when in reality the envelope, or mine at least, is a traditional lick-to-seal one.

Granted, that’s not a big deal. But two mistakes involving a single ballot package? I can’t recall the last time there was any mistake on a ballot, and I’ve voted in every election for the more than 20 years I’ve lived here.

It may be unfair to give voice to this next concern. But it needs to be asked. What else went wrong? It’s the mistakes you don’t see which can cause the biggest problems.

The people of San Mateo County should insist on a thorough, top-to-bottom independent third-party audit of the Elections Office. Our hard-working county employees deserve not to work under a cloud, and county residents deserve a first-class election operation.

Mark Olbert

San Carlos

The letter writer is a member of the San Carlos City Council. The views and opinions expressed here are his own, and do not necessarily represent those of the city of San Carlos or its City Council.

 

By Michael G. Stogner

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San Mateo County Human Trafficking of Minors, Child Abuse,CPS, Judges, Sheriff & Undersheriff, District Attorney, Priests.

San Mateo County Residents know and remember April 21, 2007 9:20 PM the night their Number 1&2 Sheriff and Undersheriff were caught, detained and Transported from a single family residence 3474 Eldon Street, Las Vegas, Nevada which had bars on all the windows to keep the Human Trafficked women and at least one minor Sex Slaves in place.

It’s all about who controls the Data, Investigations, Charges, to protect the abusers.

 

 

 

April 25, 2007 Emails of Support and Condemnation of the Media by SMSDA’s 1&2 no concerns for the victims. None

emails&literature

December 17 2015-2

San Mateo County Sheriff Greg Munks hires Mike Brosnan to be the County’s first Human Trafficking Coordinator $140,000 first yr. Carlos Bolanos raised it to $280,000 the next year. Paid for with Measure A funds.

Why wasn’t Jody Williams of Las Vegas considered for that position. She has much more experience in helping victims of Human Trafficking. Also the Supervisors never questioned Munks or Bolanos as having a conflict of Interest in that subject since it is a fact they were detained as customers in Operation Dollhouse. Recently San Mateo County Sheriff Deputy Heinz Pushendorf has stated they were both Transported to the Las Vegas Metro Police Department. He also stated while he was President of the Deputy Sheriff Association Carlos Bolanos ordered him not to speak about Operation Dollhouse. Jody Williams recently confirmed they were Transported.

District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe is now interested in Jody Williams. Secret Warrant.

Jody Williams Search Warrant

As a Private Victim’s Advocate I support victims to go public before you report any criminal act to the School, the Church, HR, Police Department, District Attorney’s Office, Sheriff’s Office etc. The article below explains why.

Excellent San Jose Inside Article by Jennifer Wadsworth

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San Mateo County’s Elected Officials Disdain for Investigative Journalists, Victims, and the residents.

April 25, 2007 at 10:20AM & 10:47AM  The San Mateo County’s 4 most powerful men were attacking the media. Almost all of the other elected officials went along with it.

What about the VICTIM’s? “Operation Dollhouse” 25 women including one pregnant and a minor. According to Jody L. Williams. Not a word. Not a concern of these fine men.

Jim, is James P. Fox San Mateo County District Attorney.

Steve, is Steve Wagstaffe San Mateo County Chief Deputy District Attorney.

Greg, is Greg Munks San Mateo County Sheriff

Carlos, is Carlos Bolanos San Mateo County UnderSheriff

emails&literature

 

L.A.Times 10/16/2018

Those before Khashoggi
After reporters die, outrage melts into indifference.
INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALIST Daphne Caruana Galizia of Malta was one of 90 journalists killed over their work in 2017. (Matthew Mirabelli AFP/Getty Images)
By Suzanne Nossel
Turkey’s allegation that Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was tortured, killed and dismembered inside Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul did something unusual: It shocked the global conscience.
That wasn’t the case for other foreign journalists killed in the last year. Not Indian television reporter Sandeep Sharma, killed when a truck rammed into him in March. Not Hector Gonzalez Antonio , a Mexican journalist whose bludgeoned corpse turned up on a dirt road in May. Not Maltese investigative reporter Daphne Caruana Galizia , who died in a car bombing one year ago. Not for more than 40 others just so far this year.
The furor over Khashoggi’s fate is striking given this backdrop. It’s broken through as a major news story even as authoritarian regimes are increasingly indifferent to criticism on human rights. Western governments are less and less willing to raise such issues, which might distract from their trade or security objectives. Shaming by human rights organizations, foreign officials and the media — the traditional tactics for defending the lives of journalists and dissidents — has lost much of its potency.
Even the heart-rending individual cases that historically put a face to human rights abuses and kindled global outrage seem scarcely to register amid the distractions of our rapid-fire news cycle. Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo was diagnosed with liver cancer while serving an 11-year prison sentence for penning a pro-democracy charter. Prohibited from traveling abroad for potentially lifesaving treatment, he died in July 2017. Not even the Nobel Prize was enough to render his health crisis a notable international cause.
Oleg Sentsov, a writer and filmmaker from Crimea imprisoned in Siberia, mounted a four-month hunger strike this summer to protest the dozens of Ukrainians being held by Russia as political prisoners. Sentsov’s case was not even mentioned when President Trump met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, Finland, three months ago.
Khashoggi’s case, by contrast, sparked an extraordinary global uproar. It attracted international headlines, threats of economic sanctions, swift bipartisan action by Congress to penalize the alleged perpetrators, and a boycott of a high-profile Saudi investment conference. The chorus of disgust even prompted Trump, who was at first clear he’d prioritize U.S. weapon sales to Saudi Arabia over any retribution, to waffle and weave. He simultaneously dispatched the secretary of State to meet with Saudi King Salman, and also mused that Khashoggi’s disappearance inside the diplomatic compound might somehow be the work of “rogue killers.”
Several factors account for the Khashoggi clamor. He was a contributor to the Washington Post and the newspaper has put its full weight behind covering the case since his disappearance Oct. 2. The revelations also laid bare how tech moguls, media personalities and Trump consigliere Jared Kushner have courted Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, naïvely imagining that the young royal would prove a reformer. That backdrop made the a llegedly state-ordered assassination not only brazen and brutal, but also an embarrassing betrayal for prominent elites.
Above all, though, the global convulsion over Khashoggi stems from the lurid spectacle: his being lured to the consulate the day before his planned marriage, the Saudi agents landing in private jets, one allegedly carrying a medical bone saw.
Will the fury over Khashoggi’s fate melt into indifference? The prospect that the Trump administration will reshape the U.S.-Saudi relationship in a gesture of protest on behalf of human rights seems far-fetched. In his own umbrage over Khashoggi’s disappearance, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan would have the world overlook his own track record as the world’s foremost jailer of journalists. His government has used false charges of terrorism to justify prosecuting reporters and editors to put Turkey’s once relatively independent news media under Erdogan’s firm thumb.
Meanwhile the Saudis will wake up to what fellow authoritarian regimes learned long ago: that even a modest veneer of legality — a show trial, some formal charges — or a modicum of distance from any accused killers can enable them to crush their critics without much fear of consequence. The relentless swirl of the news cycle means that Khashoggi won’t remain on the home screen forever.
Khashoggi’s disappearance has prompted people of conscience in capitals, newsrooms and corporate boardrooms around the world to wonder what we have come to. Yet if this tragedy is to prompt a true reckoning, it must encompass not just this singular alleged act of savagery but a much wider, accelerating pattern of intimidation, suppression and abuse of those who dare to dissent, of which the Saudi journalist is but one victim.
Suzanne Nossel is the chief executive of PEN America, which works to protect free expression rights in the United States and around the world.

To all the journalist who have paid with their lives, I say Rest in Peace, and Thank You.

By Michael G. Stogner

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Few reports against police upheld, You can interchange Judges, District Attorneys,Prosecutors,CPS,Probation Officials & Those Who Matter.

 

This is a very good article, Thank You LATIMES,

My recommendation is to stop reporting privately and before you report a Corrupt San Mateo County Sheriff Deputy and the alleged crimes his has committed against his children, his ex wife, and the Court (photos to CPS and filed with the family law court), The purpose to harm the mother, First of all you would be Stupid to report this crime to San Mateo County Sheriff Office under the leadership of Carlos Bolanos. He has a history of protecting Corrupt Deputies. SMCSO Lt. Andrew Armando is a current example. So before you report to the A.G. or the Feds you must cover your bases and give the District Attorney’s Office a chance to prove that they are opposed to a Sheriff Deputy filing false documents to CPS and the Court. You would also hope they would acknowledge the obvious conflict of Interest the current girlfriend of the Deputy works for the DA’s Office. After you go twice to report the criminal acts of (your ex) the SMC Sheriff Deputy, The DA finally takes the complaint they hate that you force them to do what they have sworn an Oath to do. Don’t be surprised when they recommend that YOU take a polygraph test and you agree to it and pass with flying colors. What did that have to do with the Deputy committing Felonies you might ask? Nothing, but if the DA was more interested in attacking the single mother/victim then prosecuting the Sheriff Deputy. Now after passing that test you would hope the DA invited the SMC Sheriff Deputy to take the same polygraph test, they choose not to and closed the criminal investigation. This lack of action only emboldens the dishonest Sheriff Deputy to once again report child abuse to the Redwood City Police Department where he has several personal friends.

San Mateo County Residents can thank the entire District Attorney’s Office and Sheriff’s Office for this.

9/23/2018 LATIMES

Few reports against police upheld

Across California, complaints of officer misconduct are often rejected and inquiries kept from public view.

By James Queally

Angry that she had been falsely accused of a drug crime, Tatiana Lopez filed a complaint against a Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputy who had arrested her on suspicion of possessing methamphetamine.

But when Lopez met with a sheriff’s lieutenant to discuss her accusation, he urged her to drop her complaint, she said.

After a preliminary investigation, the Sheriff’s Department ruled the deputy had done nothing wrong, without giving her any explanation.

It would take years of legal battles before a judge exonerated Lopez and a new internal investigation led the department to fire the deputy for lying about her arrest.

Lopez is one of nearly 200,000 members of the public who filed a complaint against California law enforcement officers in the last decade. Her initial complaint ended the way most did — with police rejecting it without saying why.

A Times analysis of complaint data reported to the California Department of Justice shows law enforcement agencies across the state upheld 8.4% of complaints filed by members of the public from 2008 to 2017.

In a state with some of the strictest police privacy laws in the country, those who make complaints against officers are entitled to learn little more than whether their allegations were found to be true or not. They are given no other explanation about how a final decision was reached, what was done to investigate their allegation or whether an officer was disciplined.

A bill that cleared the state Legislature last month would begin to address the issue by opening up records from internal investigations into shootings by police officers and other major force incidents, as well as cases where officers were found to have committed sexual assault or lied on duty. Gov. Jerry Brown has not said whether he will sign the measure, Senate Bill 1421.

But even if he does, records from the vast majority of internal affairs investigations would remain secret.

The Times’ analysis of complaint data found several of California’s largest police agencies sustain complaints at a lower rate than the state average, including the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department and the Los Angeles and Oakland police departments.

Police officials argue that a large number of the complaints they receive are frivolous, filed by people they have arrested or others who have an ax to grind. Some said the proliferation of body-worn cameras among California police agencies has helped disprove a larger number of allegations about interactions between police and the public.

In Los Angeles, police said the low rate of upheld complaints was due, in part, to the department’s commitment to accepting a wide array of allegations. The LAPD received 25,006 complaints from the public in the last decade, according to state records. Officials concluded there was evidence proving 1,360, about 5.4%.

“We take every single complaint on the planet,” said Josh Rubenstein, the LAPD’s chief spokesman. “When you open yourself up to that wide a spectrum, you are going to get a high number of complaints that are not legitimate.”

Cmdr. Michael Hyams, who heads the LAPD’s Internal Affairs division, said that by examining even the flimsiest of allegations, the department has proved it will heavily scrutinize its own officers. He noted there has been a dramatic drop in citizen complaints against LAPD officers. State records show the number fell by roughly 67% from 2008 to 2017.

At the Sheriff’s Department, internal investigators upheld only 69 of 15,661 complaints made by members of the public in the last decade, less than 1%, according to figures the agency reported to the state.

Nicole Nishida, a department spokeswoman, said the agency had under-reported the number of sustained complaints to the state. By the department’s own accounting, roughly 8% of all public complaints were upheld from 2004 to 2016, she said.

Peter Bibring, director of police practices for the American Civil Liberties Union of California, said that a low rate of sustained complaints does not necessarily mean a department is doing a poor job of policing itself, but the lack of information disclosed about those investigations is a significant problem.

“If their complaint is rejected, they are not told why,” he said. “That lack of transparency prevents the public from having any faith that the process is working.”

California law requires police departments to report the number of citizen complaints and the outcome to the state’s Department of Justice, but no agency audits the data to ensure the figures are accurate. A Justice Department spokeswoman said the agency is not required by law to conduct audits and hasn’t been given funding to do so. The state has gathered such data since 1981 and expanded the database to include information about racial profiling complaints in 2016.

Wayne Fisher, a former deputy attorney general in New Jersey who helped set the state’s guidelines for monitoring internal affairs complaints, said it was pointless to collect the data without checking to see whether some agencies are rejecting an abnormally large number of complaints and deserve more scrutiny.

“It acts as a pointer system to certain other areas that are screaming for analysis,” said Fisher, who now leads the Rutgers University Policing Institute.

Francine Tournour, a civilian watchdog for the Sacramento Police Department, agreed. Police departments need to be more open about their investigations into complaints about officers if they want the public to trust the results, she said.

“Part of this is customer service. Part of this is the relationship building,” she said. “If you have a process where people make complaints … and there’s no feeling that the complaint was taken seriously, you may see people stop bringing things to the department.”

In Sacramento, a city with a population of nearly 500,000, police reported only 18 complaints to the Department of Justice last year. Det. Eddie Macaulay, a department spokesman, said the agency did not include an additional 301 informal “inquiries,” a label used when department officials believe it was clear that an accusation did not amount to a violation of policy or crime. Had the department included those inquiries in its reporting to the state, its rate of sustained complaints would have plummeted.

Tournour, who heads the Sacramento Office of Public Safety Accountability, warned that handling such complaints informally can distort the history of documented allegations against individual officers — and a department as a whole.

In 2016, Jasmine Abuslin accused more than a dozen Oakland police officers of having sex with her, sometimes in exchange for information about prostitution raids. Her accusations — including that the misconduct began when she was underage — sparked a scandal that made national headlines and led to the firing and prosecution of several officers.

During her first contact with an internal affairs investigator, Abuslin said the police official seemed uninterested in her allegations.

“I felt like she wasn’t taking me seriously,” she said.

She also accused internal affairs investigators of threatening her for coming forward and of allowing her to delete text messages that could have proven her allegations.

Members of the public have filed 16,345 complaints of misconduct against Oakland police officers in the last decade, according to the state data. Only 1,073 of those complaints, roughly 6.5%, were sustained.

Oakland police did not respond to requests for comment.

In recent years, police agencies in California have had to report more details about citizen complaints and their outcomes, including how many they decided were false, involved conduct that did not amount to a policy violation or could not be proved or disproved. Last year, police agencies statewide concluded that 28% of complaints were false.

In Fresno, Chief Jerry Dyer said he has sought more thorough investigations and urged his internal affairs department to revisit investigations where it could not prove or disprove a misconduct allegation.

Fresno has one of the highest rates of sustained complaints among California’s largest cities. The department upheld 325 out of 1,332 citizen complaints in the last decade, roughly 24%, according to the state data. Last year, the agency reported it couldn’t prove or disprove less than 6% of complaints made by the public, compared with the statewide average of 25%.

The push for more conclusive results better serves the community, said Dyer, adding that he supports releasing more information about the way complaints are reviewed. The current process, which sees citizens simply receive a form letter announcing a complaint’s disposition, “raises a lot of concerns on the part of those voicing the complaint,” Dyer added, though he said he does not support making individual officer disciplinary records public.

For Lopez, the shortcomings of the internal investigation into her complaint about L.A. County sheriff’s deputies destroyed her trust in law enforcement.

The Downey woman was a college student with no criminal record in 2009 when three deputies trained their guns on her in a gas station parking lot. Deputy Francisco Enriquez alleged he found several bags of methamphetamine in his cruiser after she rode in its back seat. He said they fell out of her pocket.

Lopez’s attorney, Thomas Beck, later obtained sheriff’s radio transmissions proving Lopez was never in Enriquez’s car.

Lopez said the ordeal had a lasting effect.

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Filed under #CarlosBolanos, #MeToo, #SanMateo, #SanMateoCountyNews, #TimesUp, 911, Board of Supervisors, Carlos G. Bolanos, Carole Groom, Chief Deputy District Attorney Karen Guidotti, Dave Canepa, Dave Pine, David Silberman, Don Horsley, Karen Guidotti, Michael G. Stogner, Michelle Durand, Mike Callagy, Prosecutorial Misconduct, Redwood City Police Department, San Mateo County District Attorney Office, San Mateo County Domestic Violence Protocol, San Mateo County Manager, San Mateo County News, San Mateo County Sheriff Office, San Mateo County Superior Court, San Mateo County Supervisors, SMC, Steve Wagstaffe, Those Who Matter, Victim's Advocate, Warren Slocum

Did San Mateo County Adult Protective Services, Protect & Advocate Properly for Firoz Jaffer? Elder Abuse Victim.

 

October 15, 2017 3:56AM Firoz Jaffer called 911 to report an assault on him and his grandchildren by his son Zainali Jaffer. Hillsborough Police responded within minutes to the home at 1026 Lancaster Lane, Hillsborough, California. San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said Firoz Jaffer was Beaten when he tried to stop his son from sexually assaulted his 3 year old son in the back yard. Here is a description from a press release by the District Attorney’s Office about one of the Court Dates.

Peo. v. Zainali Jaffer (2-16-88), Hillsborough Police Department 664- 288.7(B)/288(B)(1)/245(A)(4)/273A(A)-Two Counts/243(B) Misdemeanor October 15, 2017; Defendant Is 29 Year Old Hillsborough Resident And Former CEO Of Mobile Advertising Company “Vungle”; At 3:56AM Sunday Morning Police Were Dispatched To Defendant’s Home In 1000 Block Of Lancaster Road In Hillsborough; They Were Met By Defendant’s Father Who Was Cut And Bleeding In Face From Being Beaten By Defendant; Father Directed Police To Backyard Where Officers Found The Naked Defendant On Top Of And Sexually Assaulting His Three Year Old Son Who Was Screaming; Officers Approached And Defendant Started Choking The Victim With His Legs; The Defendant Ignored Orders To Stop And Kept Choking The Child; Officers Had To Use Taser To Control The Defendant; The Defendant Continued To Resist The Officers And Spat At The Sergeant; The Officers Determined That Defendant Had Also Punched And Struck His One Year Old Daughter As Well As The Three Year Old Son And Beat His Father When The Father Tried To Intervene; 17-NF-012415-A (DDA Sharon K. Cho) 

-The case was set in SSF Felony Court, Dept. 9, Judge Stephanie G. Garratt, for the preliminary hearing. The defense written section 1050 motion to continue the hearing in order to conduct further investigation and preparation and based on a new attorney added to the defense was granted without prosecution objection. The case was continued to January 31, 2018 9:00 for the preliminary hearing with a 90 minute estimate. This will be the second setting of the preliminary hearing date since the initial felony arraignment on October 17, 2017. The defendant’s father failed to appear in court despite the fact he was served with a subpoena. The defense attorney represented the father returned to his home in England. At the request of the prosecution, the court issued a $25,000 bench warrant for the witness’s arrest. The defendant remains out of custody on $300,000 bail bond (posted on October 26, 2017). The defense attorney is Daniel Olmos (retained). 

My question is did APS offer and provide all the services needed for him to be safe and have an advocate to explain the legal process for example “It is Illegal for you to leave the Country after you have been served a subpoena.” You are the key witness besides the 3 police officers and the body camera videos etc.

Michael Callagy should Audit San Mateo County on this case, including CPS.

By Michael G. Stogner

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Filed under #MeToo, #SanMateo, #SanMateoCountyNews, #TimesUp, 911, Attorney Generals Office, Board of Supervisors, Body Camera Video, Carole Groom, Chief Deputy District Attorney Karen Guidotti, Citizens Access TV, CPS, Dave Canepa, Dave Pine, Don Horsley, Hillsborough Police Department, Hon Stephanie Garratt, John Beiers, John Maltbie, John Ullom, Karen Guidotti, Michael G. Stogner, Michelle Durand, Mike Callagy, Organized Crime, Patrick Clancy, Prosecutorial Misconduct, San Mateo County District Attorney Office, San Mateo County Domestic Violence Protocol, San Mateo County Manager, San Mateo County News, San Mateo County Superior Court, Steve Wagstaffe, Those Who Matter, Victim's Advocate, Vungle, Warren Slocum, Zain Jaffer